© 2015 by A Museum Man/Mommy Has Tattoos, LLC
 

My Favorites:

A Tale of Two Tassels - Raphael and Holbein in The National Gallery, London

1/8
Please reload

Search By Tag:
Please reload

Stay In The Know:

June 3, 2019

Faithfully copying Old Master drawings and sketches is a time-honored tradition amongst artists and students of art.

It’s universally considered one of the more reliable ways of learning to draw and has been a popular practice for centuries. I personally used copying O...

June 2, 2019

 We never discuss Leonardo da Vinci’s name when it comes to Renaissance sculpture. And why would we? He left no famous sculptures! So it may surprise you to learn that Leonardo spent 17 years (nearly a third of his life) working on a single sculpture; during which time...

May 31, 2019

Faithfully copying Old Master drawings and sketches is a time-honored tradition amongst artists.

It’s universally considered one of the more reliable ways of learning to draw and has been a popular practice for centuries. I personally used copying Old Master drawings (...

March 10, 2017

This fresco cycle by Andrea del Sarto was completed over the course of about a decade (thanks to many long pauses) for a church in Florence which no longer exists. The cycle still stands because it's such a famous and integral part of both his reputation and of Florent...

March 9, 2017

Halfway between Florence and Rome in Italy lays the small town of Orvieto, and The Orvieto Cathedral; most famous today for it’s chapels housing fresco cycles representing – of all things… Judgement Day and the Apocalypse! This cathedral is decorated in demons, the ris...

March 5, 2017

This is the first of several 1 minute (ish) informational videos... "A Museum Man Minute." This one is about the ONLY marble bust at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City that has teeth! I've got a full blog post about it here, but for a quick introduction, c...

March 3, 2017

At the National Gallery in London, you’ll find both Hans Holbein the Younger’s double portrait, “The Ambassadors” as well as “Portrait of Pope Julius II” by Raphael. These are – on the surface – very different paintings by very different artists. Sure they both rely on...